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correspondents will bring you extensive coverage of the long road to recovery from hurricane sandy. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. this barrier island on the new jersey shore is one of the areas hit hardest by hurricane sandy. in a moment, we'll show you what the storm did to this community and talk to some of the people who live here. they're facing a fourth day without power as the nights grow colder. but first, the number of people who lost their lives in this storm is now up to at least 87 in nine states. in new york city, firefighters and police went door to door checking on residents. mayor michael bloomberg said the death toll in the city is up to 37 now. today, police recovered the bodies of two staten island children who were literally torn from their mother's arms and swept away on floodwaters monday. millions of people in 11 states from virginia to new hampshire are spending a fourth night in the dark. nearly 4.5 million homes and businesses are without electricity. but the cavalry is on the way. the air force i
toll from hurricane sandy, and it's not likely to stop there. bodies are being found today in homes as rescue workers reach into the hardest-hit areas. the pictures that struck us today were of just one family in staten island, new york. 14-year-old kate at her grandparent's house. her mother, julie, trying to pull something recognizable from the rubble. and sheila and dominick trayna holding on to their memories and contemplating the future. the insurance industry estimates economic losses from the storm at $50 billion. second only to hurricane katrina. more than three million homes and businesses are still without power as the nights grow colder. in parts of new york and new jersey, there's high anxiety as the gas gauge drops to empty and the lines go on for hours. this evening, new york city's mayor reversed himself and canceled sunday's new york city marathon. his hand forced by withering criticism. > they got generators over there to keep the runners warm. we need the help! >> pelley: the starting line for the race was to be on staten island, home of the trayna family where at
on the fiscal cliff. a nor'easter bears down on shores ravaged by sandy. ben tracy is there. we'll have the forecast. >> i don't know if we can mentally handle another storm. >> pelley: and one secret to the president's success was the changing face of america. anna werner on the new voters who helped push him over the top. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. this is a special one-hour edition. $6 billion was spent on political campaigns and when they were over nothing much changed. republicans will still control the house, democrats the senate, and barack obama will still be president. this was the scene tonight as the president and the first family returned from chicago aboard air force one. they landed at joint base andrews right outside washington, d.c we will have a look at what you can expect from washington many the future, but first the latest returns. we still can't project a winner the presidential contest in florida, but even without florida mr. obama has 303 electoral votes-- well over the 270 needed for vict
of time in new jersey dealing with the response to hurricane sandy. 41% of the voters we talked to said that was an important factor in how they cast their vote. most people had already made up their minds. only 8% told us that they made up their minds in the last few days. 11% said they made up their minds in october. but fully almost 80%, scott, they had decided who to vote for before that. >> pelley: anthony, thanks very much. let's bring in our chief washington correspondent and anchor of "face the nation" bob schieffer and the coanchor of cbs "this morning," norah o'donnell. bob, too close to call? what do you think? >> i tell you, scott, what i draw from this first wave of exit polls it just underlines why the election has been so hard to figure out as it has from the beginning. the data is simply contradictory. for example, our exit polling has some good news for the president. 43% believe the president's policies favor the middle-class. 52% believe governor romney's policies favor the rich. yet 53% believe the federal government is doing too much while only 41% believe it should
to hit new york and new jersey which are still trying to recover from hurricane sandy. some of the victims of that storm will vote tomorrow at temporary polling stations. bob schieffer is our chief washington correspondent and anchor of "face the nation." bob, what are you looking for this this tight race tomorrow? >> well, i'll tell you, scott, we talked to the top people in both campaigns today and this may come as a surprise but both sides are flat out predicting not just wins but big wins. the obama people say they feel good about the early voting in most of the key battleground states. they feel very good about iowa and nevada. they think they're ahead by a little there florida. and they may be right. but republicans tend to do better at getting their voters out on election day, so they can turn all that around and the romney people are arguing that the enthusiasm and the intensity they're seeing at their rallies will make that happen. i have to say, when you clear away all the spin, it is coming down to one thing: turnout. which side gets their voters to the polls tomo
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)